This week, Jay and I have a wide-ranging discussion on some of the week’s top compliance related stories. We discuss:

  1. Tom reports on Compliance Week 2017. See his articles in Compliance Week, here and here.
  2. If the DOJ releases new information in the form of the Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Programs, does anyone read it. See article in GIR (sub req’d).
  3. Jay discusses the SCCE event he attended last week in San Francisco. See Jay’s recap in his article I Left My #SCCE Heart in San Francisco or I Love It When A Plan Comes Together!
  4. Was the individual enforcement against the MoneyGram CCO significant or much ado about nothing? See article by Dick Cassin in the FCPA Blog and by Sara Kropt in her Grand Jury Blog.
  5. DOJ will embed prosecutors overseas. See article by Sam Rubenfeld in WSJ Risk and Compliance Journal. See full text of speech by Deputy AG Trevor McFadden by clicking here.
  6. Warriors and Cavs meet in the first time, three consecutive title match run. Tom and Jay consider from the compliance perspective.
  7. Tom announces the release of his new book 2016 – The Year in Corporate FCPA Enforcement. For more information and to purchase, click here.

 

Jay Rosen can be reached:

Mobile (310) 729-6746

Toll Free (866)-201-0903

JRosen@affiliatedmonitors.com

Tom Fox can be reached:

Phone: 832-744-0264

Email: tfox@tfoxlaw.com

The key concept from the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Evaluation of Corporate Compliance Program (Evaluation) is operationalization. For instance, under the query Shared Commitment is the following question – “How is information shared among different components of the company?” Under the Prong relating to Policies and Procedures the Designing Compliance Policies and Procedures asks, “What has been the company’s process for designing and implementing new policies and procedures? Who has been involved in the design of policies and procedures? Have business units/divisions been consulted prior to rolling them out?” Lastly, under the same Prong is Responsibility for Integration, with the following question “Who has been responsible for integrating policies and procedures?”

These questions point to a Chief Compliance Officer (CCO) or compliance practitioner demonstrating how compliance is being burned into the fabric of an organization. While leadership at and from the top has long been considered by both the DOJ and compliance professionals as a key element to move compliance forward, the Evaluation has also crystalized thinking around compliance leadership from the middle and the bottom. I thought about these concepts when reading a recent Financial Times (FT) article by Andrew Hill, entitled “Leadership from the bottom up”. I was particularly struck by a quote from Shlomo Ben-Hur, a professor at IMD business school, who said, “We teach the top 5 per cent — but the majority of this work is carried out by the other 95 per cent.”

In Ben-Hur’s work he found that many executives came from the middle management ranks. They tended to be persons “with a determination to “take what I have responsibility for and make it truly great.”” Anecdotally, he related “They typically said, ‘I’ve responsibility for the minibus,’ and people then asked them to drive bigger and bigger buses until one day they drove the whole business.”” Think of the military and the responsibility given to front line commanders and how that “is increasingly reflected at large companies.”

The key for companies is that senior management must “find ways to transmit leadership skills to people who do not have ‘leader’ in their job description and will probably never attend a top-level leadership program.” Hill noted, “Ben-Hur’s work has focused on ensuring that managers understand how to assign the right jobs to their team members and motivate them to perform well, using theories of behavioural change that senior executives have typically never learnt on their way to the top. Dedicated managers well below the executive board need to know how to use these tools.”

For the CCO or compliance practitioner, this provides a clear path to help in the operationalizing of compliance by providing the tools to persons far down the organization to put compliance into the operations of a business. One thing Hill writes about is a company should nuture such learning because by doing so, it will both teach practical skills around compliance but also foster a strong internal network of compliance advocates who can move initiatives up and down and organization. Moreover, as these individuals progress through the company ranks, they can take their compliance message with them at each new level.

Building on the writings of Hill and the work of Professor Ben-Hur, my suggestion is to build a Compliance Excellence Center in your company. Bring in middle-managers to focus on understanding not only their roles in compliance but also how to assign the right team members to a compliance initiative and motivate employees going forward. Hill wrote that Airbus has recently established a corporate ‘university’ to spread leadership ideas through the company. Airbus’ theory behind this push is “being a leader isn’t just about being a vice-president; it’s about being able to push the company towards new ways of doing things and executing the things we have to execute. That could [apply to] a blue-collar worker on the shop floor or a VP.”

A key is not simply to train such middle and front line managers on compliance but getting them to consider rollout, effectiveness, testing and improvement. In other words, as Jay Martin would say, it is all about execution. One way to help facilitate this is through exercises using incentives to “make leadership insights stick and change workplace behavior.” Hill also writes that concepts from entrepreneurship can assist in such learning by encouraging managers to “think and act independently” to operationalize compliance. Finally, never forget mentoring as a manner to spread good compliance practices throughout a company if a more formal approach is not possible.

Too often, strategies to move a compliance program or even an initiative come from the top of an organization and are pushed down. To fully operationalize compliance, you must have leadership in compliance further down the organization which (hopefully) has been a part of the design process and can lead the implementation throughout an organization. 

Three Key Takeaways

  1. While tone at the top is critical, the tone at the bottom can actually work to more fully operationalize compliance.
  2. 95% of the work is done at this bottom level.
  3. Use HR to come up with a strategy to move compliance into the bottom for more complete operationalization.

 

This month’s series is sponsored by Advanced Compliance Solutions and its new service offering the “Compliance Alliance” which is a three-step program that will provide you and your team a background into compliance and the FCPA so you can consider how your product or service fits into the needs of a compliance officer. It includes a FCPA and compliance boot camp, sponsorship of a one-month podcast series, and in-person training. Each section builds on the other and provides your customer service and sales teams with the knowledge they need to have intelligent conversations with compliance officers and decision makers. When the program is complete, your teams will be armed with the knowledge they need to sell and service every new client. Interested parties should contact Tom Fox.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am excited to announce at Compliance Week 2017 the publication of my latest book 2016-The Year in Corporate FCPA Enforcement: Cardinal and Provident, published by Compliance Week. In it I take a look the most prolific year in FCPA enforcement and what it means for the compliance practitioner.

We have never seen and may well never see again a year of FCPA corporate enforcements as we did in 2016. The Department of Justice (DOJ) and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) combined twenty-seven corporate enforcement actions and nearly $2.48bn in total fines and penalties, the highest since the statute’s enactment in 1977. The vast majority of that amount, some 90 percent, was generated by a few very large and significant FCPA enforcement actions involving the following entities: VimpelCom, Och-Ziff, Embraer, JPMorgan, Odebrecht/Braskem, and Teva. While these cases all involved substantial, company-wide bribery schemes, which led to their massive penalties, the majority of 2016’s FCPA enforcement actions involved relatively small-to-medium-sized penalties which involved less systemic, routine bribery schemes. Yet these smaller cases usually provided some of the most interesting fact patterns, which can be studied by chief compliance officers (CCOs) and compliance professionals to help prevent and detect bribery in their organizations.

What do these enforcement actions signify? More importantly what are the lessons to be drawn from these cases for compliance going forward? What about the FCPA Pilot Program, what does it portend for the future. Finally I consider the public comments of the regulators around FCPA enforcement and compliance. You can parse the facts and figures but if you want to understand what 2016 means going forward for the compliance profession, this is the book for you. If you are a compliance professional, this is the single must have  book around the the most prolific year in FCPA enforcement history.

You can purchase of copy of the book, from Compliance Week by clicking here.

If you are attending Compliance Week 2017, drop by the Compliance Week booth for an autographed copy!

Show Notes for Episode 53, for the week ending May 19, the I Left My Heart in SF Edition

This week, Jay and I have a wide-ranging discussion on some of the week’s top compliance related stories. We discuss:

  1. Brazilian President Temer comes under corruption fire? See article in the New York Times.
  2. The turmoil at FIFA continues as FIFA’s ethics watchdogs quit in protest after their chairman was fired. See article in Bloomberg.
  3. Should compliance and ethics be wedded? New report by Institute of Business Ethics and the Ethics Institute considers the issues. See article in WSJ Risk and Compliance Journal.
  4. The Fat Leonard scandal lands U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Robert Gilbeau with a prison sentence of 18 months. See article in the FCPA Blog.
  5. Almost one-third of all open FCPA investigations involve Brazil. Only 17% involve China. See article in the FCPA Blog.
  6. Astros lead the MLB with the best record in baseball. Will they regress to the mean?
  7. ComTech is here. Are you ready? See Tom’s article in the FCPA Compliance and Ethics Blog.
  8. Jay previews his Weekend Report.
  9. It is not too late to join me at Compliance Week 2017. Listeners to this podcast can received a discount to Compliance Week 2017. Go to registrationand enter discount code CW17TOMFOX.

 

Jay Rosen can be reached:

Mobile (310) 729-6746

Toll Free (866)-201-0903

JRosen@affiliatedmonitors.com

Tom Fox can be reached:

Phone: 832-744-0264

Email: tfox@tfoxlaw.com

 

 

 

In this episode, Roy Snell and I discuss the following:

  • Measuring the effectiveness of your compliance program three ways;
  • Why Roy thinks the CO shouldn’t chair the compliance committee – but maybe the general counsel should;
  • Who I think should chair the compliance committee;
  • Why you should prove your point 5 different ways instead of just 1;
  • Brexit: Keep Calm and Do Compliance; and
  • How Compliance transcends politics.